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Tips on Tobacco Storage

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If you want to save on tobacco, you know that bulk is the best value, so you may need a way to keep it in top condition. Additionally, you may have a number of open tins that need some more robust storage options to keep them from drying out. That’s the purpose of this article, so read on and find a bunch of ideas for short-, intermediate-, and long-term storage choices.

Short-Term Pipe Tobacco Storage

For short-term storage of open tins, take a piece of plastic wrap, lay it over the open tin, then screw on the lid. This works like plumber’s Teflon tape to fill in the gaps in the screw threads to hold the moisture inside. This will help maintain the tobacco for a month or two. You can do the same thing with snap-lid cans, like those used by Captain Black and Borkum Riff, but it won’t be quite as secure, and is only good for about a month. Bulk Tobaccos can be kept in the ziplock bag it comes in for about a month. For any longer than a month, try putting one bag inside another to create an additional barrier.

Intermediate-Term Pipe Tobacco Storage

Intermediate storage consists of the use of tobacco jars. Many of these are made of ceramic or acrylic, use a bail enclosure with a locking mechanism, and some come with additional humidification. Because of the tight seal caused by the bail-lid and a thick silicone gasket, these jars can keep tobacco in good shape for months at a time, For ones that don’t come with humidification devices, there are small humidifiers that you can purchase to put in them.

Another intermediate storage option for bulk tobaccos would be to use a vacuum sealer. Just load the tobacco into the appropriate type of bag for your sealer, pack it tightly in the bag since after using the sealer, a lot of air will be removed. Be especially sure that there are no loose pieces of tobacco near the part of the bag that will be sealed. Any particles that get near or into the seal will cause air to leak into the bag. This method will keep tobacco in good shape for a number of months.

Long-Term Pipe Tobacco Storage

Long-term storage really comes down to one option – mason jars. These jars, with their modular lids and seals, are your best bet for keeping your tobaccos in good condition for a long time. If properly sealed, you don’t need to add any additional humidification. Here’s the most efficient method for keeping your stash in mason jars:

  • If you want to promote anaerobic fermentation, fill the jar to the very top. If you prefer aerobic fermentation, leave some air space at the top of the jar.
  • Before packing the jars, fill the jar 2/3rds full of water and put it in your microwave, and run it until the water begins to boil. Remove the jar from the microwave with a potholder or insulated glove, empty the water, and quickly dry the interior. While the jar is still hot, pack the jar and seal it tightly. As the jar cools, it will draw a slight vacuum, which will help to keep the tobacco moist for an indefinite period of time.

For people who prefer tinned tobaccos, they can be used for long-term storage, as long as you check to make sure that the seal is intact. Cans, like those used for codger blends can keep tobacco in good condition for about a year, but many people have opened cans years after purchasing and the tobacco was still moist, but your mileage may vary. Find additional tips on long-term storage in our Aging Pipe Tobacco article.

Tips on Tobacco Storage

Back To Tobacco FAQ

If you want to save on tobacco, you know that bulk is the best value, so you may need a way to keep it in top condition. Additionally, you may have a number of open tins that need some more robust storage options to keep them from drying out. That’s the purpose of this article, so read on and find a bunch of ideas for short-, intermediate-, and long-term storage choices.

Short-Term Pipe Tobacco Storage

For short-term storage of open tins, take a piece of plastic wrap, lay it over the open tin, then screw on the lid. This works like plumber’s Teflon tape to fill in the gaps in the screw threads to hold the moisture inside. This will help maintain the tobacco for a month or two. You can do the same thing with snap-lid cans, like those used by Captain Black and Borkum Riff, but it won’t be quite as secure, and is only good for about a month. Bulk Tobaccos can be kept in the ziplock bag it comes in for about a month. For any longer than a month, try putting one bag inside another to create an additional barrier.

Intermediate-Term Pipe Tobacco Storage

Intermediate storage consists of the use of tobacco jars. Many of these are made of ceramic or acrylic, use a bail enclosure with a locking mechanism, and some come with additional humidification. Because of the tight seal caused by the bail-lid and a thick silicone gasket, these jars can keep tobacco in good shape for months at a time, For ones that don’t come with humidification devices, there are small humidifiers that you can purchase to put in them.

Another intermediate storage option for bulk tobaccos would be to use a vacuum sealer. Just load the tobacco into the appropriate type of bag for your sealer, pack it tightly in the bag since after using the sealer, a lot of air will be removed. Be especially sure that there are no loose pieces of tobacco near the part of the bag that will be sealed. Any particles that get near or into the seal will cause air to leak into the bag. This method will keep tobacco in good shape for a number of months.

Long-Term Pipe Tobacco Storage

Long-term storage really comes down to one option – mason jars. These jars, with their modular lids and seals, are your best bet for keeping your tobaccos in good condition for a long time. If properly sealed, you don’t need to add any additional humidification. Here’s the most efficient method for keeping your stash in mason jars:

  • If you want to promote anaerobic fermentation, fill the jar to the very top. If you prefer aerobic fermentation, leave some air space at the top of the jar.
  • Before packing the jars, fill the jar 2/3rds full of water and put it in your microwave, and run it until the water begins to boil. Remove the jar from the microwave with a potholder or insulated glove, empty the water, and quickly dry the interior. While the jar is still hot, pack the jar and seal it tightly. As the jar cools, it will draw a slight vacuum, which will help to keep the tobacco moist for an indefinite period of time.

For people who prefer tinned tobaccos, they can be used for long-term storage, as long as you check to make sure that the seal is intact. Cans, like those used for codger blends can keep tobacco in good condition for about a year, but many people have opened cans years after purchasing and the tobacco was still moist, but your mileage may vary. Find additional tips on long-term storage in our Aging Pipe Tobacco article.